Tuesday, November 4, 2008

barack obama is the first black president.

congratulations, democrats.



Barack Obama cruised to victory Tuesday night in an historic triumph that promised change, overcame centuries of prejudice and fulfilled Martin Luther King's dream that a man be judged not by the color of his skin, but by the content of his character

Obama, a first term senator will little experience on the national level, made history by defeating Sen. John McCain, one of the country's most experienced politicians and a bona fide war hero.

Obama's history making victory was fueled by his soaring rhetoric, his themes of change and hope in uncertain economic times, as well as deep dissatisfaction with the last eight years of the Bush administration.

Obama's campaign was historic for reasons beyond his skin color. He raised more money than any other candidate in U.S. history, and had to first defeat Sen. Hillary Clinton, who was the party's favorite to win the Democratic nomination.

Voters from a broad swath of America's diverse ethnic enclaves and economic communities celebrated Obama's win Tuesday night, particularly those in the African-American community.

Thousand's flocked to Chicago's Grant Park to await the election results. In Harlem, New York the black community took to the streets to celebrate.

"You can't be anything but joyful. Obama is going to change the world," said Jeff Mann, 51, a construction worker in Harlem.

Crucial to Obama's victory was winning all of the states that Democrat John Kerry won four years ago and flipping of Ohio, New Mexico and Iowa, states that all voted Republican in 2004.

"Unless something staggering happens, it's hard to see how [McCain] gets to 270," said George Stephanopoulos, ABC News' chief Washington correspondent, when it became clear that Obama would win Ohio, significantly decreasing Sen. John McCain's chances of securing the 270 electoral votes needed to win.

Obama, 47, the son of a black man from Kenya and white woman from Kansas, served just two years in U.S. Senate before declaring his candidacy and ultimately taking on one of the most experienced politicians in America.

A moderate conservative who tried to stress his credentials as a maverick and distance himself from an unpopular president, McCain, 72, was unable to motivate his base and overcome his associations with Republican incumbent President Bush.

By almost every quantifiable measure -- from the $640 million Obama raised in the month of October, to the nearly $1 billion combined the campaigns have spent, to 9 million newly registered voters -- records have been shattered.

Yet another record may fall once the number of voters is tallied. Turnout was heavy throughout the day and could surpass previous voting turnout records. The existing records were set in 2004 when more than 122 million Americans went to the polls, and in 1960 when 64 percent of eligible voters cast a ballot.

Each of the candidates was a dark horse who pundits predicted would never make it past the first weeks of their parties' respective primaries. Obama ultimately beat out Democratic favorite Sen. Hillary Clinton for the nomination, the first glimmer of future success.

In perhaps the greatest and most calculated flip-flop of his campaign, Obama forwent public financing allowing him to raise hundreds of millions of dollars from donors contributing small amounts of money, proving that he was not just a neophyte who could make good speeches but a scrappy politician from Chicago.

McCain too changed course. In the final weeks of the campaign, the Arizona senator struck a more negative tone and along with Vice Presidential running mate Gov. Sarah Palin of Alaska began attacking Obama on his relationships and judgment.

In the third and final presidential debate, McCain assailed Obama for his relationship with 1960s radical William Ayers and his campaign began aggressively using auto-dialed calls to voters, known as "robocalls," to relay negative messages, frequently focusing on the Democrat's experience and readiness for the White House.

That strategy didn't seem to achieve the desired effect, with voters responding in polls in the race's final weeks that they were turned off by the negative ads and attack tactics.

The economy is nationally the overwhelming issue for voters casting their ballots in today's historic presidential election, according to early exit polls.

Despite the possibility of Obama becoming the nation's first black president, the turnout of black voters as a percentage of the national vote was at 13 percent, just slightly higher than in 2004, according to early exit polls.

The economy has long dominated the campaign, and voters' concerns became heightened when the major banks and credit markets needed a massive federal bailout to avoid a fiscal catastrophe.

Four in 10 voters said their family's financial situation is worse than it was four years ago, and eight in 10 are worried the current economic crisis will hurt their family finances over the next year.


source: ABC news.



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